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2019 Prime Minister's Prize for Excellence in Science Teaching in Secondary Schools

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Dr Samantha Moyle

Dr Moyle is recognised for her passion for science and being a role model to her students. As the lead teacher in the Think Big Special Interest Program for integrated learning in STEM at Brighton Secondary School (SA), she demonstrated a full story of accomplishment from the classroom, to the school and to the community, providing a tangible picture of a dedicated and influential teacher with impact.

Read professional achievements and citations [187KB PDF] [246KB DOCX]
 

Transcript

[Music plays and an image appears of the Australian Government Coat of Arms and the Prime Minister’s Prize For Excellence in Science Teaching in Secondary Schools badge and text appears: Prime Minister’s Prize for Excellence in Science Teaching in Secondary Schools, Dr Samantha Moyle], The Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science, Celebrating 20 years]

[Image changes to show Samantha and students looking at a bush and then the image changes to show female students taking a photograph of a bee on a flower]

Dr Samantha Moyle: I work at Brighton Secondary School as a science and other technologies teacher.

[Image changes to show Samantha talking to the camera and the camera zooms in on Samantha’s face]

My parents were teachers.

[Images move through to show a photo of a bee on a Smartphone screen, Samantha and students looking at the flower, the students photographing a tree trunk, and the students looking at the photo]

I started working in a school as a Laboratory Manager and I got to connect with the students and see them develop their love of science.

[Images move through of Samantha writing on a board, a student wearing a headset, two students watching, and the student with the headset moving a controller around on a screen]

I inspire students to love science through creative, hands on and dynamic approaches to learning science. I want it to be fun and exciting.

[Images move through of Samantha displaying the fire tornado experiment, Samantha talking to the camera, the spiral of red fire in a container, and Samantha watching the fire tornado experiment]

So, one of the experiments is the fire tornado and it’s very simple physics but I combine it with a little chemistry and to see the children’s faces light up when you have a spiral of red fire in front of them is really exciting.

[Images move through of students gathered in the courtyard of a school, students seated at desks, and Samantha talking and pointing to a PowerPoint slide]

At Brighton Secondary School we run Think Bright.

[Images move through of the students seated at desks, Samantha pointing to the PowerPoint slide, and a female student working on a laptop]

We integrate the learning so that the students understand that subjects don’t occur in silos and that learning doesn’t occur in silos. We did a trebuchet unit.

[Image changes to show Samantha talking to the camera again and the camera zooms in on her face as she talks]

So, that came from history where they were looking at the war machines and then in science we prototyped and tested their different types of trebuchets.

[Images move through of Samantha operating a tablet, Samantha pouring liquid into a clear container and then shaking it up while the students watch, and then Samantha talking to the students]

I created my Doc Moyle Facebook page to share things that I find really interesting about science but also for the students to connect with me about the things that they’re interested in.

[Images move through of an insect photographed on a Smartphone screen, Samantha and the students looking at something in some leafy foliage, and then Samantha talking to a class of students]

It’s allowed me to reach out to all students, especially disengaged students.

[Images move through of a display on a SmartScreen, Samantha and a group of students watching, and one of the female students smiling]

Being a recipient for the Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science is the most humbling experience.

[Images move through to show Samantha writing on a board while the students watch, glowing balls rolling down a corridor, and Samantha and the students watching]

I get to be a representative for the amazing teachers out there who are doing dynamic and interesting things in their classroom every day around Australia.

[Images move through of the students smiling, students seated at desks listening to Samantha, Samantha talking to the camera, and Samantha standing in an empty classroom smiling at the camera]

The advice I would give to students wanting to pursue a career in science or STEM is to question everything, to get out there and do it and don’t let anything hold you back.

[Camera zooms in on Samantha smiling]

[Music plays and the image changes to show the Australian Government Coat of Arms and the Prime Minister’s Prize For Excellence in Science Teaching in Secondary Schools badge and text appears: Prime Minister’s Prize for Excellence in Science Teaching in Secondary Schools, Dr Samantha Moyle, The Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science, Celebrating 20 years]