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  • The Trade Remedy Index (TRINDEX) shows the weighted average unit price and volume of imported goods as an index. It does not show actual volumes or prices.
  • Weighted average unit prices are calculated using the free on board (FOB) price of each import. Price indices are based on import prices in Australian dollars. FOB prices include all costs (including inland transport and insurance) relating to the goods until they reach the place of export.
  • For all products except 2,4-D, each chart within the TRINDEX shows a 2017 index base, as well as 2018, 2019 and 2020 monthly index values for each source country, as well as for the total of all countries.
    • In relation to volumes, the 2017 index base is the 2017 monthly average volume for a country (or total of all countries).
    • In relation to prices, the 2017 index base is the weighted average unit price for a country across the 2017 calendar year (or total of all countries).
    • The 2018, 2019 and 2020 monthly index value divides the actual monthly volume/weighted average unit price by the 2017 index base.
  • For 2,4-D, each chart within the TRINDEX shows a 2018 index base, as well as 2019 and 2020 monthly index values for each source country and the total of all countries.
    • The index base for 2,4-D is based on the nine month period from 1 April to 31 December 2018, whereas (as noted above) the index base for all other products in TRINDEX is based on 2017 data. The reason this period has been selected for determining the 2,4-D base index is that prior to the measures being revised in March 2018, importers were required to declare the acid equivalent volume of 2,4-D. The revised measures no longer require importers to on an acid equivalent basis. Therefore, to ensure a fair comparison of monthly index volumes/prices, 2,4-D import volumes and prices are only considered after the revised measures took effect.
    • In relation to volumes, the 2018 index base is the monthly average volume for a country (or total of all countries) for the period 1 April 2018 to 31 December 2018.
    • In relation to prices, the 2018 index base is the weighted average unit price for a country (or total of all countries) for the period 1 April 2018 to 31 December 2018.
  • For all products other than 2,4-D, the TRINDEX reports country of origin sources greater than three per cent of 2017 volumes, as well as emerging significant new sources. Emerging new sources are countries that had less than 3 per cent of the 2017 import volume but have reached their 2017 index base in any given month in 2018, 2019 and 2020.
    • For 2,4-D, the TRINDEX shows country of origin sources greater than three per cent of 2018 volumes, as well as emerging significant new sources. Emerging new sources are countries that had less than 3 per cent of the import volume during the period 1 April 2018 to 31 December 2018 but have reached their 2018 index base in any given month in 2019 and 2020.
  • Only countries that have exported to Australia in the last 6 months are shown on the charts.
  • The ADC sources data from the Australian Border Force import database in order to produce the TRINDEX. In many cases, the raw data includes a broader subset of goods than is necessary for the Anti-Dumping Commission’s (the Commission) analysis[1]. The Commission filters the data to ensure the analysis is as accurate as possible by only focusing on relevant imported goods. The Commission regularly reviews its data cleansing processes to ensure the data is accurate. Where improvements are identified, there may be small changes to historical data. The steps the Commission takes to cleanse the data include:
    • Only including imported products that are subject to measures.
    • Only including imports that fall within a certain unit price range and which meet a certain minimum import volume. The unit price range and minimum import volume may vary from product to product.
  • The TRINDEX does not:
    • consider Australian industry members’ sales volume or prices in the market
    • examine whether the imported goods are dumped or subsidised
    • assess potential injury to Australian industry
    • consider domestic demand for the products
    • compare year-on-year seasonal fluctuations.

Footnotes

  1. For example, because the data includes all imports under the relevant tariff classifications, rather than just goods subject to anti-dumping measures