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Growth Centre: METS Ignited
Publication Date: 
October 2018
Case study from: Growth Centres Success Stories

How would you help to improve gender diversity in traditionally male dominated industries? The Industry Growth Centres Initiative is helping address imbalances and advance women in STEM through an innovative training program.

Business in focus: Austmine

After identifying a shortage of women in the Australian mining equipment technology and services (METS) sector, Austmine sought financial support from the METS Growth Centre, METS Ignited, to create an experienced community of future female employees and address skills shortages in the industry.

Austmine’s Women in STEM: METS Career Pathway Program works to promote and provide career opportunities in the METS sector to women studying a STEM degree. The program provides mentoring, industry skills training and on-the-job experience to help prepare women for the workforce.

Industry partners provide students with a paid 10-week internship where they gain practical skills and experience, as well as connections with industry.

Following experience with an industry partner, 30 per cent of students accepted ongoing employment with their host organisation while they continue to study, an additional 8 per cent of graduate students have since accepted roles with other METS firms and 70 per cent of participants indicated they would actively seek a job in the METS sector.

On the back of this success, Austmine is rolling out their next round of placements. This is making great headway in an industry with a substantial shortage of women.

Austmine is just one of the many organisations across six sectors unlocking its success with Australia’s Industry Growth Centres Initiative. If your business has unrealised potential, now could be your time.

Fact

While there are significant opportunities in the METS sector, consisting of over 2,500 companies employing close to 400,000 people, few women consider it as a career option.



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